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20110701
20110731
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CSPAN 19
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
of international troops. i hope we can all agree that the taliban has morphed into a hybrid. it is one part terrorist organization and one part global drug trafficking organization. for the past today years, virtually every heroin processing lab raided by the dea, special forces, and afghan police has ties to the taliban. what they find is not only large quantities of opium and heroin, but also improvised explosive devices, bomb making materials, and taliban training manuals. in one raid last year, 2056 pounds of high-grade heroin with a wholesale value of $56 million was seized. experts agree it may take many years to get the drug trade in afghanistan under control. as the military begins to scale back its presence this month, i think we have got to ensure that our civilians continue to support counternarcotics efforts in afghanistan. that is really important. a year ago this month, this caucus released a bipartisan report that contained several policy recommendations. i like to highlight the progress being made and what remains to be done. first, the good news. the caucus recommended incr
associated allies, especially the taliban, of course. he also felt like there had been progress in developing and training the afghan national security forces, the army and the national police, especially in the past year-and-a-half. still a long way to go. he did not make any comments specifically yesterday about the killing of ahmad karzai. he let those comments to the white house. it expressed regret and condemn the assassination of president karzai's half-brothers. i think there is concern generally that there could be some instability, beahmad wali karzai in its prominent position in canada are what ikan -- kandahar, he was a key figure in keeping control there. that may have been more of a concern a year ago before the u.s. had managed to reclaim control of that area with its afghan allies and partners on the ground. so there may not be as much ramification now as there might have been a year ago. still there is likely to be jockeying for position and power among the local forces there. host: finally, the defense secretary did not cut a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk abou
sense after 9/11 to hunt down bin laden. he was clearly there, the taliban refused to cough him up. i think it made sense to invade. it does not make sense to be there now a decade later, or more, with not even a clear withdrawal plan. >> what's your take on marijuana? >> marijuana is -- should be legal and it -- it should be as legal and acceptable as booze. >> abortion laws. >> abortion laws, i'm in favor of a woman's right to choose and i think that whenever your take on abortion, and i'd say maybe 30 percent of libertarians are very, very anti-abortion, because they believe that the fetus, at least, at a certain point deserves the rights that everybody else has. government funding should not be involved in abortion but more to the point, we are at the very early stages of actually controlling our bodies, our biology, our reproduction. i think abortion is becoming less and less important to public discourse and will continue to, as we develop more control over how -- how and under what circumstances we have children. >> the department of education. >> the federal department of educ
of defense dollars are going to afghanistan. we were out of the taliban out of power. karzai stood for free elections in 2004. al qaeda was dismantled and settled in waziristan and pakistan. this is not a nation-building exercise. this encounter terror exercise. we do not need 100,000 troops on the ground at the cost we are paying today in order to get the job done. [applause] and i am here to tell you that the future of the u.s. is not going to be determined in the prairies of afghanistan. the future of the u.s., whether you want to recognize it or not, is going to be determined by how well prepared we are to compete in a highly competitive 20th -- 20 per century, and that battle is going to be waged across the -- 21st century, and that battle is going to be waged across the ocean. as you walk off of this building, i want you to remember why we are in this race. it is about the generation behind us and the condition they will find our nation in. it is totally unsustainable, the debt trajectory that we are on. and number two, the reality of launching a new industrial revolution, it is withi
happen in kandahar province, which is the real former stronghold of the taliban. he has a lot of enemies, both among the insurgency and also among the various criminal networks that work in that area. he himself has been accused of drug ties, criminal ties, and even of being on the payroll of the cia. all things that ahmad wali karzai denies. he has a very murky reputation. it's hard to know, even though the taliban claims responsibility, what happened and who is behind it. host: how does the u.s. view him? guest: the u.s. has most recently seen him as an unsolvable problem. he has been a friend to the u.s. for a long time. because he has been someone who has been hard to bring on board with some of the programs to develop the province, to work with the military -- no one says this directly, granted, because he is a relative of hamid karzai. in private talks, u.s. officials would say they do not know exactly how to handle him. at the same time, he was also someone who was exerting a certain amount of control over the area and able to pass by areas that may not have otherwise been passed
salary cuts. host: let's take a look at some other stories. u.s. cash said to be reaching the taliban, yearlong military that investigation concluded u.s. taxpayer money has been indirectly funneled to the taliban under 2.1 $6 billion transportation contacted the u.s. has funded in part to promote afghan business. another piece in international news, the u.s. has invited a north korean official to new york for talks. the vice foreign minister will visit for a rare meeting that could pave the way for resumption of multinational denuclearization talks secretary of state clinton said on sunday. and politics, congressman wu faces calls to step down print reports the democratic u.s. representative and the portland, oregon area, calls for his resignation from some in his own party after the state's largest newspaper published reports this week in of an alleged unwanted advances in november by a mr.wu for the young, california woman, the daughter of a longtime supporter. one last jury in politics from the washington times politics section, dnc targeting hispanic votes with 8 spanishad. both
radio address and she addressed the issue of the taliban and women in afghanistan. she focused on the challenges related in afghanistan. it is not something she intended to focus on when she went to the white house in 2001, but certainly history change the course of all about. she immersed herself and found a way to make a difference in women's lives and girls' lives are on the world. she has taken these opportunities to speak to the communities. host: i noticed yesterday at the funeral in palm desert, calif. that two of the speakers talked about the sisterhood of the first ladies. barbara bush will be there in grand rapids when lynn cheney is speaking to it. is there a sisterhood of the former first ladies? guest: i think there is. it is a very small club. many dead get to serve as first lady. -- there are not many that get to serve as first lady. at the betty ford funeral, they turned out to show their respect. they show that there is a way to be friends and set aside the differences in politics. it was really heartwarming to see rosalynn carter be a part of that service. and
.s. taxpayer money has been indirectly funneled to the taliban under a $2.16 billion, a $2 billion transportation contract. this is crazy. it should not be part of the job of the u.s. military to promote afghan businesses. this report found, quote, documented credible evidence of involvement in a criminal enterprise of support for the enemy, unquote. this is ridiculous. and it comes on the heels of a report last week that the navy has spent at least $300 million, at least $300 million, on two ships that were never completed, never sent on a mission, and are now headed for a salvage yard in brownsville, texas. are there no fiscal conservatives at the pentagon? and sadly, most people in congress today are afraid to cut the defense department for fear they will appear to be unpatriotic. and yet it seems to me, mr. speaker, that it's unpatriotic to continue with megabillions and wasteful spending, or billions in spending that promote businesses in other countries. no part of the federal government should be immune from having to save taxpayer money. the american people would be far bet
have been over there to try to wipe out al qaeda and the taliban, which has been in league with al qaeda. we have been over there losing american lives and spending american taxpayer dollars to protect our country from another 9/11. to say that we're going to c $1 trillion in the future over the next ten years when we aren't placing the emphasis on what are the conditions on the ground is not sound policy and it's certainly not sound national security policy. so that's illusy. and then the other parts of the cuts that i think are very hard to decipher are cutting waste, fraud and abuse, which we all want t do, but we don't have the guarantee of those cuts. so i think it is important for us to look at the cuts and try to make sure that if we're going to raise the debt ceiling, we raise it only the amount ofhe actual cuts that we can produce. in the majority leader's -- majority leader reid's legislation, there is a joint committee. there is also one in the boehner bill. but in the majority leader's legislation, the committee has to report but its product doesn't have to be passed an
is training eventual new members of the taliban. he further stated, trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army or police force in afghanistan. the general closed his email to me by saying this, every day someone dies. every day someone dies. it is time to bring our troopings home from -- troops home from afghanistan. how many more children have to cry in a mom or dad's grave site because their mother or daddy went to afghanistan to prop up a corrupt leader named karzai that we send $10 billion a month to? i hope no other children have to cry like edy and stephanie. that brings me to my close, mr. speaker. several weeks oak eugene robertson in his editorial titled "afghanistan strategy, let's go." we wanted to kill or capture osama bin laden, and we did. even so, say the hawks, we have to stay in afghanistan because of the dangerous instability across the border in nuclear armed pakistan. but does anyone believe the war in afghanistan has made pakistan more safe? no, it has not. in fact, it's more fragile now than it's ever been. the threat from afghanistan i
with explosives. the taliban have claimed responsibility for the attacks. there were 19 people killed. among them, pbc says, was one of its reporters, -- bbc says, was one of its reporters, a 25-year- old person who has been with the agency since 2008. those are some headlines from c- span radio. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your chance to talk to, at emailed adn -- your chance to e-mail i and tweet the best-selling author. this weekend, on american history tv on a c-span3, the national portrait gallery celebrates modeled reagan's birthday -- ronald reagan's birthday. then, a stanford university professor, the great migration. we will be in charleston, south carolina, as we look at the city's history, including a talk on the role of the city during the american revolution. get a complete weekend schedule on c-span.org/history. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning, it is "washington journal," connecting you with elected officials, policymakers and journalists. watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and weak dots, hearings and
from the terror of the taliban, and afghan forces are taking more responsibility for their security, and he takes with him and memories of americans who have made the old of -- the ultimate sacrifice to make this possible. lee roy gave me the extraordinary privilege of showing me the small plaque bolted to his profit a farm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers from -- goes into his prosthetic arm -- bolted to his prosthetic arm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers. those who did not come back the day. christopher's mother, sister, and grandmother are with us today. i would ask that they stand briefly so we can show our gratitude for their families profound sacrifice. [applause] our heroes are all around us. they are the forces behind the force, like ashley, who during his deployments has kept the family strong, so we are grateful to her and the other armies spouses here. [applause] the military children like britney, austin, reagan, and land in, -- landen, who is there to gently rubbed his hand across arm, so we are there to recognize good children as well. [applause] ou
members of the taliban. trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army. and, mr. speaker, then, it was kind of sad the way he closed. every day somebody from our country dies. a marine, a soldier, an airman, navy, whatever. mr. speaker, i bring posters on the floor. i have probably 12 now that i want to bring on the floor every time that i speak to remind the house that there's pain in war. the wife to my left on the poster is in tears. the little girl who's about 2 years of age, she doesn't understand why this army officer is kneeling before her with a folded flag. but, yet, i will say to the little girl, when you grow older and you are old enough to know your daddy was a real hero, sergeant jeffrey shear, who gave his life for this country. mr. speaker, that leaves me to sharing with the house an editorial that was written about four weeks ago by eugene robinson and the title is "afghanistan strategy: let's go," and i want to read from his editorial. slinder threads of hope are nice, but they do not constitute a plan, nor do they justify continuing to pour
of every six department of defense dollars is going to afghanistan. we got the taliban out of power. karzai stood for free elections in 2004. al qaeda was dismantled and sent into western pakistan. this is not a nation-building exercise. this is a counter-terror exercise. we do not need 100,000 troops on the ground of the cost we're paying today in order to get the job done. [applause] thank you. i am here to tell you the future of the united states is not going to be determined in the prairies of afghanistan. the future of the united states is going to be determined by how well-prepared we are to compete in a highly competitive 21st century. that battle will be waged across the pacific ocean. we have some work to do. as you walk out of this building, i want you to remember why we're in this race. it is because it is about the generation and we're about to pass the country to and the condition in which they will find it. my priorities will be debt and spending. we have no choice. trajectory we're on is unsustainable. launching a new industrial revolution is within our grasp. it has happened
to the taliban we were going to withdraw. while they may not have watches, they do have calendars. [laughter] you drive them away if they know they only have to hideout for a certain time. i think of -- i think that was a mistake on his part. i think he should have made sure that the public elections were held in such a way that there was public confidence. i think there are lessons learned. one is, we have been there 10 years. id is time for the afghan people to be able to take responsibility -- it is time for the afghan people to take responsibility for there own safety that has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. we do want to see the afghans pick up the responsibility for the effort that goes for word. in the determination of when to pull our troops out should come as a result of the input of the people closest to the battlefield, the generals and the leaders on the ground. at the president should be listening more to them as david cameron in the u.k. did. >> i know you do not agree with the method we got into all there. now that we are there, do we need to stay in libya until colon
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)